What I Learnt | Hibiscus by Lopè Ariyo

Hibiscus is a beautiful and colourful cookbook filled with Nigerian-inspired dishes. I say Nigerian-inspired because the dishes are based on traditional Nigerian food and ingredients, but feature unconventional methods and spices, to offer a unique experience, and cater to a Western (British) audience. I was a little shocked by some of the dishes featured in … Continue reading What I Learnt | Hibiscus by Lopè Ariyo

Thoughts On | La Bastarda by Trifonia Melibea Obono

La Bastarda tells the African queer story from a different perspective. It features lesbian and gay characters in a very traditional village in Equatorial Guinea. The main character, Okomo, grapples her feelings about her father's abandonment, and what it means to be a 'bastard', a woman, and a lesbian, in a society that values none. … Continue reading Thoughts On | La Bastarda by Trifonia Melibea Obono

Thoughts on | Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi

“The family is like the forest: if you are outside it is dense; if you are inside you see that each tree has its own position.”  This quote captures some of my feelings after reading Homegoing. I have a large family and we're all pretty close. Whenever I talk to my friends about a family member, … Continue reading Thoughts on | Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi

What I Learnt | How to Be a Bawse by Lilly Singh

How to Be a Bawse is Lilly Singh's guide to working harder and conquering life, rather than just going through the motions and surviving. The spelling of 'bawse' is intentional to characterize "someone who excels in both personal and professional settings". The lessons are peppered with Lilly's life experiences, and the book has prompts and … Continue reading What I Learnt | How to Be a Bawse by Lilly Singh

Thoughts On | Second Class Citizen by Buchi Emecheta

Second Class Citizen tells the story of Adah Ofili, a Nigerian woman born in Lagos during World War II. The story begins with Adah's childhood, dealing with her father's death and her determination to be educated, and describes her adulthood in London, married to Francis, an abusive and unambitious (some might say lazy) husband. The … Continue reading Thoughts On | Second Class Citizen by Buchi Emecheta

Thoughts on| Stay With Me by Ayobami Adebayo

“Sometimes I think we have children because we want to leave behind someone who can explain who we are to the world when we are gone.”  This quote in Chapter 17 of the book sums up Yejide’s whole quest for motherhood Goodreads summary: Yejide and Akin have been married since they met and fell in … Continue reading Thoughts on| Stay With Me by Ayobami Adebayo

What I Learnt| I’m Judging You by Luvvie Ajayi

I like this book! It’s a collection of essays about Life, Culture, Social media and Fame. Luvvie delves into serious topics like rape culture while simultaneously haranguing hashtag abusers #stopmisusinghashtags . I love how she’s able to move from lighter topics to more serious ones and blend the whole thing to make a great book. Did … Continue reading What I Learnt| I’m Judging You by Luvvie Ajayi